free pattern

imageNarf! Pinky is one of my all time favorite cartoon characters. Sure he wasn’t all brains, like Brain, but his unique way of looking at the world and his creative intelligence, though a mouse cartoon, is just as important to embrace in society today as a PHD. So I have named my shawl made with Beachy Keen gradient kit by Fierce Fibers the Narf! Shawl.

(note: the shawl is really easy to knit, however my instructions are not detailed enough for a beginner, sorry…this is my first pattern, ever. Please bear with me! If you see anything amiss, please don’t hesitate to contact me on Ravelry.)

Narf! Shawl

Narf! Shawl:

Yarn: 1 gradient kit by Fierce Fibers in the Beachy Keen color way, or any other set of 5 colors of fingering weight yarn.

Yardage: 400-460 yards +- 10 yards depending on how full/long you want your tassels to be.

Gauge: 23 stitches and 32 rows = 4 inches in stockinette

  • Gauge is not important as the shawl is designed to use up all the yarn from the gradient kit. When a row cannot be completed, set aside the remaining yardage for the tassel. =)

Size: approximately 51″ wide x 18.5″ deep

Tools:

  • Size US 7 (4.5mm) 24″ or longer circular needles
  • the Loome tool or 3″ piece of cardboard
  • Darning needle
  • Scissors
  • Blocking supplies

Abbreviations:

  • M1R – make 1 increase right leaning (insert left needle into bar between stitches, back to front, knit into the front loop)
  • M1L – make 1 increase left leaning (insert left needle into the bar between stitches, front to back, knit into the back loop)
  • yo – yarn over
  • ssk – slip, slip, knit
  • k2tog – knit 2 stitches together
  • psso – pass slipped stitches over

Basic Construction:

Start with a garter tab. Cast on 3 stitches and work 8 rows. With 3 stitches still on the needle, pick up 5 stitches evenly along the edge and 3 at the other end for a total of 11 stitches. I went with 3 for a solid garter edge. Just my preference. =)

The main piece is a basic 6 increase shawl – 4 increases on the right side and 2 increases on the wrong side. There is 1 stitch in the center and three stitches each side for the garter edge. Check out the various shawl construction types here on Craftsy for the wide and shallow triangle shawl or if you’d like a different shape.

Row 1: Work garter edge. yo, knit to center, M1R, knit 1, M1L, knit to last three stitches, yo, work garter edge. (inc 4 stitches)

Row 2: Work garter edge, yo, purl to last three stitches, yo, work garter edge. (inc 2 stitches)

Work each color in these two rows until you cannot work a complete row. This leftover yarn will be used for the tassels.

End the 4th color after a right side row, knit row (inc 4 row). Begin wrong side row with the 5th/last color and work as a normal wrong side row (inc 2 row).

If you are using less than 5 colors, note that the lace edging section is worked with the 5th mini-skein being a little under 100 yards.

Lace Edging:

image

Set up Row (WS): Work garter edge stitches and purl to the last 3 stitches, you will no longer be increasing for the rest of the shawl. Work last 3 garter stitches.

Row 1 (RS): Work garter edge stitches, repeat (k2tog, yo) across until the center stitch. Depending on how many stitches you have you will either come to 1 stitch before the center stitch, or just the center stitch.

  • If you have 1 stitch before the center stitch: yo, slip 2 as if to knit, knit 1, psso, yo. This should give you a neat centered decrease. Repeat (ssk, yo) to the last 3 stitches, work garter edge stitches.
  • If you have just the center stitch: knit 1. Repeat (yo, ssk) to the last three stitches, yo, and then work the garter edge stitches.

So now you’ve got your first set of eyelets going. The right side should be slanting slightly to the right and the left side should be slanting slightly to the left.

Row 2 (WS): Work garter edge stitches, purl across, and then work garter edge stitches.

Repeat this eyelet pattern across again (rows 1 and 2). (total of 4 rows worked! yay!)

Row 5 (RS): Next, to create the subtle zig-zag effect, on the right side of the shawl work garter edge stitches, repeat (yo, ssk) to the center stitch. Work the center as previously noted in Row 2 depending on how many stitches you have available.

  • On the other side of the center stitch if you did the center decrease: Repeat (k2tog, yo) to the last 3 stitches, work garter edge stitches.
  • If you did not do the center decrease simply continue to repeat (yo, k2tog) to the last three stitches, yo, and then work the garter edge stitches.

Row 6 (WS): Work as Row 3.

Repeat this eyelet pattern across again (rows 5 and 6). (total of 8 rows worked! yay!)

Row 9 (RS): Work as Row 2.

Row 10 (WS): Work as Row 3.

Bind off loosely knitwise. I prefer the double knit method: Knit 1 (knit 1, slip both stitches back to the left hand needle, knit together through the back loop), repeat. This should leave it nice and sproingy for blocking the edge out to points, or giving the shawl a nice curve. Your choice! =)

Tassels:

imageI used my H Loome, you can use any piece of cardboard or pegboard you have at about 3″. If you’re not familiar with tassel making, watch this video! (does not require the Loome)

Make 3 tassels.

For my tassels I did this:

Step 1: Cut off extra yarn from the edges of the shawl, leaving a tail long enough to weave in.

Step 2: Take the two shortest pieces and cut them in half.

Step 3: Taking one of each color of the yarn you just cut in half, wrap them onto the Loom for making a tassel.

I happened to only have three usable pieces of leftover yarn to use for the tassels. If I make this again, I think I will purposely stop each color earlier so that I make sure to have a little bit of each color in all my tassels.

I also made sure to use more yarn for the third tassel and placed it as the center stitch decoration. I managed to make it a little bit longer than the other two by wrapping loosely around my H Loome.

Note about blocking:

image

For a subtle wave, I blocked out the top of the shawl as straight as I could, and then every 5 k2tog/ssk column along the bottom edge. (I really need to get my mitts on blocking wires!)

Attach tassels to the two opposite corners and the bottom center stitch, weave in loose ends. Wear and enjoy!

Narf! Shawl


*I am not sponsored to produce this blog post. All products mentioned were purchased with my own money and are things that I enjoy using. *

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Angora!

A few years ago Norichanknits gave me some cascade angora and a bunch of purple random brand merino. No idea why she’d want to give up something that was A) one of her favorite colors and B) soft as a new born baby’s bottom.

But anyways, it sat in my stash for a while because I didn’t really know what to do with angora. For those of you that don’t know, it’s a very fluffy bunny. VERY FLUFFY BUNNY. The purple and pink top is a result of a free pattern plus a few extra details and changes made by me.

And here’s the final product:

Angora/Merino sleeveless top

IMG_1673

Pattern is based off of Purl Bee’s Cap Sleeve Lattice Top.

My changes:

  1. Knitted in the round. -1 stitch on accident. So it’s a little uneven by 1 stitch in the backside but totally unnoticeable. =)
  2. A smidge of waist shaping.
  3. Lattice part is obviously not lattice. It’s a 3×5 purled bias stitch.
  4. Not sure what the lacey bit is called, but I added it in for some additional interest to the piece.
  5. Shoulders include a smidge of gathering so that it doesn’t actually cap off and instead sits nicely along the curvature of my shoulder.
  6. I blocked the arm holes really tightly. If I had made it to spec, there wouldn’t have been such a huge problem. (Lace = stretchy)

Future plans:

As far as this particular pattern goes, I can see it being really nice in the summer made out of Bamboo Pop.

I’m getting rather good at these sweaters. I’ve only been actively producing knitted sweaters for about two years. The first few I don’t wear unfortunately. Le sigh. But this pink and purple thing I’ve actually worn quite a few times already. And with that I’ve come to the realization that I like more basic looking sweaters: no frilly lace or “unique” fits. The first three sweaters I made were like that and I rarely wore them after finishing. (Baley’s Irish Cream, Selene, and Levenwick). I may revisit Levenwick though in the future in a softer and thicker yarn.

I’m currently working on another sweater that is also turning out on the small side. Hopefully blocking will save it like it did for the Lattice Top. I do have weird habit of blocking my sweaters into an unwearable large size. My Westbourne ended up being too big for me though I thought I had followed the sizing correctly.

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